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Things to do before your consultation

To help your consultation run as smoothly as possible, we have put together a checklist for our patients.

  • Please complete our new patient form before you arrive. If this is not possible, we ask that you arrive around five minutes before your scheduled consultation to allow time for you to fill it in.
  • Please consider your reason for booking a consultation with Dr Tickle and ensure you bring any relevant notes or documents with you.
  • Come prepared! We know how frustrating it can be when you get home only to realise you have forgotten to ask something during your consultation.
  • We respectfully request that consultations are paid for on the day and we accept cash, cheques and all major credit and debit cards (except Amex)
  • Please visit our FAQs page for further information.
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Dr Tickle’s Health Club

Let us help you to spread the cost of your medical care. Paying a small fee monthly will cover all appointments, casework, consultant liaison and referral letters as well as telephone and email contacts and prescriptions. There are significant discounts on health checks and home visits too, and no hassle with invoices. Laboratory fees and injections are not included and will be billed separately.

The health club can be paid for annually or monthly, although the initial payment will be for 6 months of membership.

Membership Monthly fee Annual fee Initial charge
Single Adult £75 £750 £375
Couple £125 £1250 £625
Family * £250 £2500 £1250

*Family membership covers 2 adults and 2 dependent children. Additional children can be added for £50 a month each.

020 7935 2610

General Practitioner and Family Doctor

Request consultation Fees

39 Harley Street, London, W1G 8QH

Navigation
Travel Vaccination Name Validity Price Per Dose When to start

Chickenpox Vaccination*
(Varilix/Varivax)

9 years £ 70 per dose

What is it?

The Varicella vaccine protects against chickenpox. It is not a routinely offered vaccination, but some healthcare workers, such as nurses and doctors, need protection if they are working with people vulnerable to infection.

Vaccine Schedule

Two doses 4 weeks apart

Booster – not required after a 2 dose course.

Note: Varicella vaccine is a live immunisation. If you require other live vaccinations such as Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR), Shingles vaccine (Zostavax), Yellow Fever or a TB vaccine (BCG) then Varicella vaccine must be given on the same day or separated by 4 weeks.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Cholera*
(Dukoral)

2 years £ 50 per dose At least a week before travel

What is it?

Cholera is spread through contaminated water and food. It is more common during floods and rainy seasons. Cholera symptoms include painless, watery diarrhoea that can quickly lead to severe dehydration and death if treatment is not received promptly. Vomiting also occurs in most patients.

Vaccination is recommended for those unable to take effective food and water precautions and those working in refugee camps or slums in outbreak areas.

Where is Cholera found?

Cholera is found in many regions of the world with poor sanitation, and includes:

  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • South and south-east Asia
  • The Middle East
  • Central America and the Caribbean

Vaccine Schedule

Two doses – Day 0 and Day 7

Booster – every 2 years

Note: Cholera vaccine is administered as a drink – You should have nothing to eat or drink for 1 hour before and after receiving the cholera vaccine. You may be given the second dose of cholera vaccine to take at home. Please note: Cholera vaccine must be stored in a fridge.

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products – available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Diphtheria Tetanus Polio
(Revaxis)

10 years £ 45 per dose A few days before travel

What is it?

Tetanus is contracted through dirty cuts and scratches and poliomyelitis (Polio) spreads through contaminated food and water. They are serious infections of the nervous system. Diphtheria is an acute infectious respiratory disease and occasionally the skin, it is also spread by droplet infection, (coughing & sneezing) and through close personal contact. Vaccination is advised if close contact with locals in risk areas is likely.

Vaccine Schedule

One Dose

Booster - every 10 years

Note: If no previous doses of these immunizations received as a child you will require five doses to confer complete immunity

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Diphtheria Tetanus Polio Whooping Cough
(Repevax) [No longer supplied to private clinics - please contact your local GP]

What is it?

Tetanus is contracted through dirty cuts and scratches and poliomyelitis (Polio) spreads through contaminated food and water. They are serious infections of the nervous system. Diphtheria is an acute infectious respiratory disease and occasionally the skin, it is also spread by droplet infection, (coughing & sneezing) and through close personal contact. Vaccination is advised if close contact with locals in risk areas is likely.

Vaccine Schedule

One Dose

Booster - every 10 years

Note: If no previous doses of these immunizations received as a child you will require five doses to confer complete immunity

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Hepatitis A *
(Avaxim/Vaqta) Original treatment and boosters

20 years £ 55 per dose A few days before travel

What is it?

Hepatitis A is spread through contaminated food and water, causing liver inflammation and jaundice. It is commonly found in overcrowded conditions where hygiene is poor.

Vaccine Schedule

Two doses – Day 0 and 6 months later

Booster – every 20-30 years after 2 dose primary course

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products – available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Hepatitis A&B *
(Twinrix)

See individual vaccines £ 70 per dose

What is it?

A Vaccine combining Hepatitis A & B – which provides the same cover – but with less vaccinations.

Hepatitis A is spread through contaminated food and water, causing liver inflammation and jaundice. It is commonly found in overcrowded conditions where hygiene is poor.

Hepatitis B is spread through infected blood, contaminated needles and sexual intercourse. It affects the liver, causes jaundice and occasionally liver failure. Vaccination is recommended for those at occupational risk (e.g. health care workers), for long stays or frequent travel to medium and high risk areas, for those more likely to be exposed such as children (from cuts and scratches) and those who may need surgical procedures.

Vaccine Schedule adults 18+

Routine – Three doses – Day 0, One month later than 6 months after first dose Accelerated – Four doses – Day 0, Day 7, Day 21 then fourth dose 12 months later

1-15 years

Routine – Three doses – Day 0, One month later than 6 months after first dose Rapid Schedule – Three Doses- Day 0, One month later then 2 months after first dose. Infants at continued risk should have 4th dose at 12 months

Booster – 5 – 10 years

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products & a sterile medical kit for use in emergency to reduce risk of infection from other blood borne viruses both are available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Hepatitis A&B for Children *
(Twinrix Paed)

See individual vaccines £ 69 per dose

What is it?

A Vaccine combining Hepatitis A & B – which provides the same cover – but with less vaccinations.

Hepatitis A is spread through contaminated food and water, causing liver inflammation and jaundice. It is commonly found in overcrowded conditions where hygiene is poor.

Hepatitis B is spread through infected blood, contaminated needles and sexual intercourse. It affects the liver, causes jaundice and occasionally liver failure. Vaccination is recommended for those at occupational risk (e.g. health care workers), for long stays or frequent travel to medium and high risk areas, for those more likely to be exposed such as children (from cuts and scratches) and those who may need surgical procedures.

Vaccine Schedule adults 18+

Routine – Three doses – Day 0, One month later than 6 months after first dose Accelerated – Four doses – Day 0, Day 7, Day 21 then fourth dose 12 months later

1-15 years

Routine – Three doses – Day 0, One month later than 6 months after first dose Rapid Schedule – Three Doses- Day 0, One month later then 2 months after first dose. Infants at continued risk should have 4th dose at 12 months

Booster – 5 – 10 years

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products & a sterile medical kit for use in emergency to reduce risk of infection from other blood borne viruses both are available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Hepatitis B *
(Engerix-B/HBVaxPro)

5 years £ 48 per dose 1 month before travel

What is it?

Hepatitis B is a virus that is spread through infected blood & bodily fluids via contaminated needles and unprotected sexual intercourse. It affects the liver, causing jaundice and occasionally liver failure. It is the most common blood borne infection in the world and is a major cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer. Vaccination is recommended for those at occupational risk (e.g. health care workers), for long stays in or frequent travel to medium and high risk areas and for those more likely to be exposed such as children (from cuts and scratches) and those who may need surgical procedures.

Vaccine Schedule

Routine – Three doses – Day 0, One month later than 6 months after first dose Accelerated – Four doses – Day 0, Day 7, Day 21 then fourth dose 12 months later

Booster – 5 years after a primary course as above which gives lifetime protection

Combine this vaccine with a sterile medical kit for use in emergency to reduce risk of infection from other blood borne viruses - available at our clinic.

Influenza (Flu)
(Inactivated Influenza Vaccine)

1 year £ 10 per dose

What is it?

Influenza (flu) is most common in winter and is a viral infection that may have serious complications, particularly in some vulnerable groups of people. The Flu vaccine is updated yearly to offer protection against the most common seasonal risk as identified by the World Health Organisation.

The Flu vaccine is inactivated and therefore cannot give you Flu!

Vaccination should be considered for those at risk of serious disease or travellers who can be at risk during the winter months, particularly if travelling in large groups or in crowded conditions such as cruise ships and pilgrimages.

We offer both individual and corporate Flu immunisation services. To find out more, or book an appointment, please contact us.

Vaccine Schedule

6months – adult 1 dose

Booster – every year

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Japanese B Encephalitis *
(Ixiaro)

1 year £ 99 per dose 1 month before travel

What is it?

Japanese B encephalitis is spread by mosquitoes in parts of Asia. It is a serious infection of the brain and vaccination is advised for those travelling to risk areas who are unable to avoid mosquito bites, staying for long periods (e.g. more than 4 weeks) or those visiting rural areas.

Vaccine Schedule (one year protection)

Two doses – Day 0 and Day 28

NB Under exceptional circumstances, IXIARO® may be given up to 4 days early (i.e. day 24) following thorough risk assessment.

The second dose of vaccine should ideally be completed 1 month before travel

Booster – every 1 – 2 years

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing insect repellent and mosquito net to ensure effective anti-bite protection. For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Meningitis (ACWY)
(Nimenrix)

5 years £ 71 per dose A few days before travel

What is it?

Meningococcal meningitis is spread by droplet infection (coughing & sneezing) and through close personal contact.

Vaccination is advised if close contact with locals is expected in risk areas. Those working with children or the local population or those visiting families with children are at higher risk.

Recommendations for Saudi Arabia – Meningococcal vaccination certificate requirements:

All adults & children over the age of 2 arriving for Hajj pilgrimage and Umrah, or for seasonal work, are required to produce a certificate of vaccination with quadrivalent vaccine against meningitis which has been issued not more than 3 years and no less than 10 days prior to arrival in Saudi Arabia.

In the UK, visas will not be issued unless proof of vaccination, at least 10 days prior to the expected date of entry, is submitted with the visa application.

Vaccine Schedule

One dose

Booster – every 5 years for travel. Every 3 years for entry to Hajj and Umrah.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Meningitis B
(Bexsero)

life time £ 125 per dose At least 2 months before travel

What is it?

Meningitis B is a highly aggressive strain of bacterial meningitis that infects the protective membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. It can be very serious and needs to be treated as a medical emergency. If the infection is left untreated, it can cause severe brain damage and blood poisoning (septicaemia). In some cases meningitis can be fatal.

A new vaccine Bexsero had been licensed in the UK, for those aged 2 months and over, to offer protection against Meningitis B. Bexsero is thought to provide 73% protection against meningitis B, which should significantly reduce the number of cases of meningitis.

How common is meningitis B?

The charity Meningitis UK estimates that there are 1,870 cases of meningitis B each year in the UK.

Meningococcal infection can occur at any age, but around half of cases are in those under 5 years of age, particularly infants less than 1 year.

The second main age group is between 15-19 years of age (around 1 in 4 teenagers carry the bacteria).

The bacteria, Neisseria meningitidis, normally lives in the back of the throat and nose and around 1 in 10 people carry the bacteria without having the disease. The bacteria is spread through sneezing, coughing and kissing.

The “B” strain of meningococcal meningitis accounts for the majority of cases of meningitis in the UK & Europe, and the majority of deaths. Until now, it has not been possible to develop a vaccine and BEXSERO represents a significant step forward.

What do we know about the vaccine?

Bexsero is the recently developed vaccine against meningococcus group B, which has now been approved by the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisations and is licensed for use in the UK.

The vaccine is effective against around 88% of the UK circulating strains of meningococcus group B and 78% of the European circulating strains.

The vaccine can be administered to infants aged two months or older either by itself, or in combination with other childhood vaccines.

The vaccine has been tested in clinical trials involving more than 8,000 people.

In infants, it was found to have similar levels of safety and tolerability to other routine childhood vaccines. The most commonly reported side effects were:

  • redness and swelling at the site of the injection
  • irritability
  • fever

Vaccine Schedule

Dosage Vaccination requires a course of two to three doses depending on age.

2 – 6 months of age it is a three dose schedule.

From 6 months, it is a 2 dose schedule with a further dose within 1-2 years depending on age.

All doses are given one month apart for adults and children over 11, and a longer gap between doses in younger children. Younger children may also need a booster dose, though the need for this in adults has not yet been established.

Infants Aged 2 months – 5 months Three doses – First dose given at 2 months of age, 2nd dose not less than 1 month later, 3rd dose not less than 1 month later Booster- 1 dose between 12 and 23 months of age.

Infants Aged 6 months – 11 months Two doses – 1st dose, 2nd dose not less than 2 months later. Booster- 1 dose in the second year of life with an interval of at least 2 months between the primary series and booster dose.

Infants Aged 12 months – 23 months Two doses – 1st dose, 2nd dose not less than 2 months later. Booster- 1 dose with an interval of 12 months to 23 months between the primary series and booster dose.

Children Aged 2 – 10 years Two doses – 1st dose, 2nd dose not less than 2 months later. Booster- Need for booster doses not yet established.

Adolescents (from 11 years of age) and adults Two doses -1st dose, 2nd dose not less than 1 months later. Booster- Need for booster doses not yet established.

MMR *
Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMRVaxPro)

Life £ 70 per dose 1 month before travel

What is it?

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) viruses are transmitted through airborne droplets spread from the respiratory tract of an infective person. Inhalation of droplets from an infected person, caused by sneezing, coughing or spitting will cause the spread of infection.

Occasionally, transmission can occur through the direct contact of throat or nasal secretions of an infected person through kissing or nasal secretions. Measles is one of the most highly communicable infectious diseases. Mainly affects children aged approximately 5 years of age.

The virus is found worldwide, but is slowly diminishing in developed countries due to the MMR vaccine.

Vaccine Schedule

Two doses – Day 0 and Day 28

Booster – not required after a 2 dose course.

Note: MMR is a live vaccine. If you require other live vaccinations such as Varicella (Chicken Pox) Shingles vaccine (Zostavax) or a TB vaccine (BCG) then the MMR vaccine must be given on the same day or separated by 4 weeks.

MMR and Yellow Fever vaccine should not be given on the same day, where possible, but given 4 weeks apart. Where immediate protection is required, the vaccines should be given at any interval. If you are travelling imminently then the nurses will be able to offer specific advice.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Pneumococcus Vaccination

6 years £ 32 per dose

Rabies *
(VeroRab/RabiesVaccineBP)

3-5 years £ 70 per dose 1 month before travel

What is it?

The rabies virus is spread through a bite, scratch or a lick on broken skin from an infected animal. It is nearly always fatal. Rabies in animals occurs in all continents except Antarctica, although some countries and islands are reported to be rabies-free. In Asia, Africa, Central and South America, classical rabies virus is endemic in stray dogs and is also present in domestic dogs. In Mexico and Central and South America, vampire bats carry the classical rabies virus.

The World Health Organization estimates that between 40,000 and 70,000 human deaths occur worldwide each year following a bite from a rabid animal. Most of these deaths occur in developing countries, particularly in Africa and South East Asia.

Who should get a rabies vaccine?

Vaccination is advised for all those travelling to risk areas that will be remote and more than 24 hours away from a reliable source of vaccine.

The risk of exposure increases with the length of stay, and if you are staying for 4 weeks or more in a rabies endemic country you should consider having rabies pre-exposure vaccine before your trip, even if you will have access to medical facilities.

Even when pre-exposure vaccines have been received urgent medical advice should be sought after any animal bite. If you have not had a course of pre–exposure rabies you will need a treatment called Rabies Immunoglobulin (RIG) within 24 hours of being bitten. In many countries the availability of rabies RIG is scarce, therefore it is recommended you get a full course of rabies vaccines before you travel.

Some travellers will be at increased risk, this includes but is not limited to:

  • Those doing bike rides or runs in risk countries
  • Those who are working with animals abroad
  • Those who are going to live, travel frequently to or spend long periods in countries with rabies
  • Those at occupational risk. E.g. working with bats

Every year more than 15 million people worldwide seek treatment following a rabies exposure and up to 900 UK travellers seek rabies post-exposure treatment, on return to the UK.

Vaccine Schedule

Three doses given on Day 0, Day 7 and Day 21 or 28

Booster – every 10 years or if bitten, scratched or licked on an open wound when travelling.

Although there is currently a shortage of Rabies vaccine in the UK – We have a good supply at the clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Shingles
(Zostavax)

life time £ 180 per dose

What is it?

If you have ever had chicken pox you can get shingles. The chicken pox virus stays in your body and can later resurface as Shingles — a painful, blistering rash. A new vaccine, Zostavax, is available and it can reduce your risk of getting shingles. It is available to anyone aged 50 years and over.

Can I get Shingles?

Anyone who has had chicken pox is susceptible to shingles, particularly those over the age of 50. Diseases that affect the immune system (e.g. non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and HIV), certain medications, stress and depression are thought to contribute to the re-activation of the virus.

What are the symptoms?

The first symptoms are a headache, mild nausea and malaise, but these are hardly ever attributed to shingles as so many conditions start the same way. The first true sign of shingles is a burning sensation under the skin followed a day or two later by the appearance of a rash, concentrated in one area.

How long does it last?

Two to three days after the painful burning sensations starts, a rash appears, turning to small blisters and red, swollen skin. After a few more days, the blisters burst and form sores, which eventually develop scabs. For most, this painful process lasts a few weeks.

For others, the area becomes very painful after the scabs have disappeared and this unpleasant pain can last for several weeks and even years.

Is it contagious?

Shingles is contagious and contact with a person who has shingles or chickenpox may cause chickenpox, while contact with a person with shingles or chickenpox cannot cause shingles.

Can Shingles Reoccur?

Yes. Once the virus is present in the body, it doesn’t leave, but rather lies “dormant” until it flares up again.

Vaccine Schedule

One dose

Booster – not required

Note - Zostavax vaccine is a live immunisation. If you require other live vaccinations such as Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR), Varicella (Chicken Pox) Yellow Fever or a TB vaccine (BCG) then Zostavax must be given on the same day or separated by 4 weeks.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Tick Borne encephalitis *
(TicoVac/TicoVac Junior)

3 years £ 70 per dose

What is it?

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is spread by tick bites. It is a serious infection of the brain and is present in many countries worldwide.

Wild animals, particularly rodents, are the main hosts of TBE virus (TBEV) and maintain a reservoir of infection from which ticks act as vectors to humans.

Transmission occurs mainly from late spring ‘till early autumn in forested/rural areas.

Vaccination is advised for those in risk areas unable to avoid tick bites such as campers, forestry workers and ramblers.

There are three main subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis that are found in the following locations:

  • European - Western Europe to Russia
  • Siberian - Urals, Siberia, far-Eastern Russia, Finland
  • Far Eastern - far-Eastern Russia, China and Japan

There are an estimated 10,000 cases annually in Russia and 3,000 in Europe, though the true number of incidents probably exceeds this by an substantial amount.

TBE is an emerging disease - incidence has risen dramatically in last 4 decades and is spreading to new areas particularly in Europe.

For a list of countries and maps please visit Tick Alert.

Vaccine Schedule

3 years to adult

Standard schedule - 3 doses – day 0, 1-3 months later and 5- 12 months after the second dose.

Rapid Schedule - 3 doses - day 0, 14 days later and 5-12 months after the second dose.

Note: If someone is considered to be at high-risk, then medication can be given from 18 months following thorough risk assessment.

Booster – every 3 years after a primary course as above. then every 3 - 5 years if at continuing risk.

Cost Per Dose £70.00

Avoiding Ticks

Ticks normally become attached to skin or clothing after brushing against bracken or long grass and then migrate to warm moist areas of the body such as groins or axillae to feed. To avoid this apply an effective insect repellent to skin. DEET insect repellent is recommended.

Avoid unnecessary exposure in infested areas. Keep to paths.

Clothing should cover the legs with socks outside trousers. Insect repellents can be used to impregnate exposed clothing such as trousers and socks DEET products are recommended.

Avoid untreated/ pasteurised dairy products in countries where TBE is present.

Carry a tick remover so ticks can be safely and easily removed as soon as possible.

We have a good supply of insect repellents, clothing spray and tick removers in our clinic

For information on tick-borne encephalitis and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Typhoid
injection (Typhim)

3 years £ 45 per dose A few days before travel

What is it?

Typhoid is spread through consumption of contaminated food and water. Symptoms include: fever, headache, constipation and sometimes diarrhoea. 10 – 15% of cases will develop severe disease that can cause septicaemia and meningitis. Untreated typhoid carries a 20% fatality risk.

Typhoid is present worldwide. Highest risk areas are in the Indian subcontinent, Asia, Africa and Latin America. In risk areas vaccination is recommended for travellers where food and water may be contaminated.

Vaccine Schedule

2 years – adult

One Dose

Booster – every 3 years

Oral Typhoid Vaccine Schedule

6 years - adult

Days 1, 3 and 5.

Booster - every 1- 3 years

Oral typhoid is taken in tablet form. You will take the first tablet in the clinic at your consultation and the nurse will give you the rest of the course to take at home. Please note: Oral Typhoid vaccine must be stored in a fridge. UK Supply of Injectable Typhoid Vaccine.

Although there is an ongoing shortage of injectable Typhoid Vaccine – We have a good supply at the clinic. If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products – available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Typhoid
tablets (Vivotif)

1 year £ 45 per dose 15 days before travel

What is it?

Typhoid is spread through consumption of contaminated food and water. Symptoms include: fever, headache, constipation and sometimes diarrhoea. 10 – 15% of cases will develop severe disease that can cause septicaemia and meningitis. Untreated typhoid carries a 20% fatality risk.

Typhoid is present worldwide. Highest risk areas are in the Indian subcontinent, Asia, Africa and Latin America. In risk areas vaccination is recommended for travellers where food and water may be contaminated.

Vaccine Schedule

2 years – adult

One Dose

Booster – every 3 years

Oral Typhoid Vaccine Schedule

6 years - adult

Days 1, 3 and 5.

Booster - every 1- 3 years

Oral typhoid is taken in tablet form. You will take the first tablet in the clinic at your consultation and the nurse will give you the rest of the course to take at home. Please note: Oral Typhoid vaccine must be stored in a fridge. UK Supply of Injectable Typhoid Vaccine.

Although there is an ongoing shortage of injectable Typhoid Vaccine – We have a good supply at the clinic. If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products – available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac

Typhoid & Hepatitis A
(Viatim)

See notes £ 89 per dose

What is it?

Typhoid and hepatitis A are present worldwide. The highest risk areas can be found in the Indian subcontinent, Asia, Africa and Latin America. Both Typhoid and Hepatitis A are spread through contaminated food and water. Typhoid causes septicaemia and hepatitis A causes liver inflammation and jaundice.

Typhoid symptoms include: fever, headache, constipation and sometimes diarrhoea. 10–15% of cases will develop severe disease that can cause septicaemia and meningitis. Untreated typhoid carries a 20% fatality risk. Vaccination is recommended for travellers where food and water may be contaminated or good food and water precautions are not possible.

Vaccine Schedule

16 years - adult

One Dose - ideally 10 days before travel

Booster Hep A - 6 months - provides cover for 20-30 years Typhoid - every 3 years

If you are travelling to an area of risk you should also consider purchasing water purification products – available our shop in clinic.

For further disease and country recommendations information visit:

Fit For Travel or Nathnac